The cost of hate

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Res Ipsa
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The cost of hate

Post by Res Ipsa »

I stumbled on this thread this morning. It’s a horrific example of what those who spread hatred as a tactic to win elections do to the lives of every day American citizens. https://threadreaderapp.com/thread/1514 ... 21185.html
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K Graham
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Re: The cost of hate

Post by K Graham »

Related to this...

Donald Trump’s presidency associated with significant changes in the topography of prejudice in the United States
A series of 13 studies with over 10,000 participants tested the change in Americans’ prejudice following the presidency of Donald Trump. The researchers found that explicit racial and religious prejudice increased amongst Trump’s supporters, while prejudice decreased among those who opposed him. This research was published in Nature Human Behavior.

In recent decades, there has been a downward trend in prejudice toward racial and religious minorities. However, some studies suggest that racial and religious prejudice had a critical role in Trump’s presidential victory. While some commentators have suggested that numerous trends following the 2016 elections (e.g., increases in reports of hate crimes, minorities reporting more discrimination) point toward a rise in racial and religious prejudice in America, others have argued that these increases may be a consequence of “increased national attention to issues of prejudice.” Other commentators from both sides of the political spectrum have suggested that even if there has been a rise in discrimination, it only reflects extremist fringe groups, rather than the broader American population.

In this work, Benjamin C. Ruisch and Melissa J. Ferguson examine “whether a single counter-normative public figure, and his widespread acceptance by a large portion of the American people, can lead to large-scale changes in social norms and societal prejudices.”

The authors tested two key predictions. First, that racial and religious prejudice significantly increased among Trump supporters but not other Americans. Second, that increase in prejudice reflected the increased acceptability of expressing prejudice (i.e., changes in social norms).

Studies 1-9 were multi-year longitudinal studies involving over 1000 participants, examining the “the breadth and depth of changes in prejudice across various target groups and measure types.” At Time 1, they included at least one measure of prejudice and various questions assessing views on social and political issues. Time 2 measures were nearly identical, and also included a question regarding support for Donald Trump.

The researchers included a wide range of measures on “political ideology, political party identification, perceptions of the US economy, perceived threat and political knowledge/sophistication, as well as demographic characteristics such as age, gender, race, education and income.” As well, they looked at environmental factors, including “income inequality, racial diversity and voter turnout in participants’ home counties” by extracting this information based on participants’ geographic location.

Study 9 included data from the VOTER survey conducted by the Democracy Fund Voter Study Group and YouGov. Responses on “voting history, political attitudes, daily lives, social group memberships, health history and demographics” from over 7500 participants who completed this survey in both 2016 and 2019 were included. These studies did not allow for the isolation of Trump support as a causal factor of changes in prejudice. However, they did allow the researchers to track changes before and after his political ascension, while statistically adjusting for over 80 possible predictors.

Using both correlational and experimental methodologies, Studies 10-13 included 1402 participants and were conducted for the purpose of providing support for a causal explanation.

Across Studies 1-9, Ruisch and Ferguson found that support for Donald Trump predicted “a significant increase in prejudice towards a range of social, racial and religious minoritized groups.” Those who generally opposed Trump, including liberals and conservatives, showed decreases in prejudice in the same time period. Studies 10-13 provided indirect support for the mechanism behind the shift in social norms.

Trump supporters perceived that expressing prejudice had become more acceptable since his election, and this perception predicted greater personal prejudice among them. As well, “experimentally leading participants to feel that Trump supporters approved of his controversial rhetoric significantly increased Trump supporters’ personal expressions of prejudice .”

The authors concluded, “Together, this research suggests that the presidency of Donald Trump may have substantially reshaped the topography of prejudice in the United States.”

The research, “Changes in Americans’ prejudices during the presidency of Donald Trump”, was authored by Benjamin C. Ruisch and Melissa J. Ferguson.
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K Graham
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Re: The cost of hate

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Hate Crimes Under Trump Surged Nearly 20 Percent Says FBI Report
Hate crimes have surged nearly 20 percent during the administration of President Donald Trump, according to a new FBI report on hate crime statistics. The report also shows that hate-motivated murders, largely committed by white supremacists, spiked to their highest number in 28 years.

The FBI's annual reports on hate crime statistics show that hate crimes have increased from 6,121 incidents in 2016 to 7,314 in 2019, a 19.49 percent increase.

Hate-motivated murders spiked to a total of 51 in 2019, the highest number in nearly 3 decades, according to an analysis of the FBI's data conducted by the Center for the Study of Hate and Extremism (CSHE) at California State University. The next-highest number of hate-motivated murders occurred in 2018 with 24 murders. The third-highest number occurred in 1993 and 1995, with 20 murders happening each of those years.
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Res Ipsa
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Re: The cost of hate

Post by Res Ipsa »

The FBI hate crime statistics are woefully unreliable as a measure of hate crimes, let alone the types of incidents represented in the opening post. Here's a pretty good article on the hate crime statistics. https://www.propublica.org/article/why- ... statistics.

Hate is a problem that is much broader than Trump. In fact, at this point, I think Trump is a symptom more than the problem.
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Re: The cost of hate

Post by K Graham »

Res Ipsa wrote:
Wed Apr 13, 2022 4:57 pm
The FBI hate crime statistics are woefully unreliable as a measure of hate crimes, let alone the types of incidents represented in the opening post. Here's a pretty good article on the hate crime statistics. https://www.propublica.org/article/why- ... statistics.

Hate is a problem that is much broader than Trump. In fact, at this point, I think Trump is a symptom more than the problem.
Yeah I get that there are issues with the FBI's methods of determining hate crimes, but their methods have been consistent for years and we never saw a 20% jump before.
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Re: The cost of hate

Post by Doctor Steuss »

Those poor littles! How incredibly terrifying and confusing. :(
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Re: The cost of hate

Post by Res Ipsa »

K Graham wrote:
Thu Apr 14, 2022 1:55 pm
Res Ipsa wrote:
Wed Apr 13, 2022 4:57 pm
The FBI hate crime statistics are woefully unreliable as a measure of hate crimes, let alone the types of incidents represented in the opening post. Here's a pretty good article on the hate crime statistics. https://www.propublica.org/article/why- ... statistics.

Hate is a problem that is much broader than Trump. In fact, at this point, I think Trump is a symptom more than the problem.
Yeah I get that there are issues with the FBI's methods of determining hate crimes, but their methods have been consistent for years and we never saw a 20% jump before.
Yes, the FBI's methodology has been consistent, but it relies on voluntary reports by local police departments. So, the numbers can be skewed depending on where the crime took place and who the victim was. With totals being based on a non-random sample of police departments, there's a 90% confidence interval surrounding that 20% that may be pretty wide.
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"Everything we see hides another thing, we always want to see what is hidden by what we see."
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