Did Trump "Drain" the swamp?

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K Graham
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Did Trump "Drain" the swamp?

Post by K Graham »

What We Found in Trump’s "Drained "Swamp: Hundreds of Ex-Lobbyists and D.C. Insiders
When the Trump administration took office early last year, hundreds of staffers from lobbying firms, conservative think tanks and Trump campaign groups began pouring into the very agencies they once lobbied or whose work they once opposed.

Today we’re making available, for the first time, an authoritative searchable database of 2,475 political appointees, including Trump’s Cabinet, staffers in the White House and senior officials within the government, along with their federal lobbying and financial records. Trump Town is the result of a year spent filing hundreds of Freedom of Information Act requests; collecting and organizing staffing lists; and compiling, sifting through and publishing thousands of financial disclosure reports.

Here’s what we found: At least 187 Trump political appointees have been federal lobbyists, and despite President Trump’s campaign pledge to “drain the swamp,” many are now overseeing the industries they once lobbied on behalf of. We’ve also discovered ethics waivers that allow Trump staffers to work on subjects in which they have financial conflicts of interest. In addition, at least 254 appointees affiliated with Trump’s 2016 presidential campaign and at least 125 staffers from prominent conservative think tanks are now working in the federal government, many of whom are on teams to repeal Obama-era regulations.

Drilling down even further, at least 35 Trump political appointees worked for or consulted with groups affiliated with the the billionaire libertarian brothers Charles and David Koch, who also have a network of advocacy groups, nonprofits, private companies and political action committees. At least 25 Trump appointees came from the influential Heritage Foundation, a conservative think tank founded in 1973, and at least two came from Heritage Action, its related political nonprofit. Heritage says the Trump administration, in just its first year, has enacted nearly two-thirds of its 334 policy recommendations.


We also found — for the first time — dozens of special-government employees, or SGEs, who work as paid consultants or experts for federal agencies while keeping their day jobs in the private sector. This rare government gig allows them to legally work for both industry and the Trump administration at the same time. Under the Obama administration, Huma Abedin, the longtime aide to former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, benefited from this policy while simultaneously working at the State Department, the Clinton Foundation and a corporate consulting firm, drawing scrutiny from the Senate Judiciary Committee and the Government Accountability Office.

Roughly 60 percent of the Trump administration officials included in our analysis have financial disclosure reports. We have requested these reports for the rest. Since our last update of financial disclosure records in August, we have added 660 such reports from across the government.

We also did a more limited version of this project in 2009, at the start of the Obama administration. As part of this year’s analysis, we compared the number of appointees in the first year of both the Obama and Trump administrations who had been active lobbyists in the two years prior to their nomination for Senate-confirmed government jobs. Even though the Trump administration has lagged significantly behind previous administrations in appointing people for such positions, more Trump appointees were recent lobbyists than Obama appointees: Trump had 18 in his first year, while Obama had 14.

“Focusing on novel scandals alone can distract from the enormous scale of the Trump administration’s embrace of revolving-door hiring,” said Jeff Hauser, executive director of the Revolving Door Project at the nonpartisan Center for Economic and Policy Research.

The pipelines between conservative policy think tanks — namely the Heritage Foundation and the Koch Brothers’ Freedom Partners Chamber of Commerce — and the Trump administration are clear, as is their effect on federal policy.

Just before Trump took office last January, Freedom Partners Chamber of Commerce, one of the main conservative advocacy groups funded by the Koch Brothers, unveiled a deregulatory wish list. The action plan highlighted 19 Obama-era policies affecting the environment, labor and technology that Freedom Partners wanted gone. “This strategy can help to unravel eight years of regulatory overreach starting immediately,” the organization’s vice president, Andy Koenig, wrote in an accompanying press release.

A few weeks later, Koenig joined the White House as a policy assistant, putting him in a position to implement his former employer’s agenda. Sure enough, just over a year later, the administration has acted on 16 of the 19 suggestions that Freedom Partners listed.

The moratorium on federal coal leases? Lifted. The Paris climate agreement? Withdrawn. The Clean Power Plan? Repealed. The FCC’s net neutrality policy, the EPA’s Waters of the United States rule, and the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s arbitration rules? All reversed.

Freedom Partners and the White House didn’t respond to requests for comment.

The Trump campaign had a small staff and was light on policy chops, so it leaned heavily on personnel from the Koch network and the Heritage Foundation during the transition. “When you have a president committed to strong deregulatory policy, there’s no better place to figure out what regulations put a stranglehold on the economy than to go to the Koch network and the Heritage Foundation,” said Marc Lampkin, the co-chair of Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck’s lobbying practice and a former aide to House Speaker John Boehner. “It makes perfect sense that they would be part of the intellectual breeding ground for the administration.”

The Heritage Foundation has touted its influence over Trump’s agenda. On Jan. 23, the organization said the Trump administration embraced two-thirds of the 334 policy recommendations in its “Mandate for Leadership,” such as shrinking national monuments in Utah, preventing taxpayer funding for international groups involved in abortion (known as the Mexico City Policy), raising military spending, and withdrawing from UNESCO.

Heritage cited the efforts of about 70 of its former employees working throughout the transition and administration. Our analysis found 28 officials who used to work at the Heritage Foundation and its advocacy arm, Heritage Action.

Not all political appointments are announced. In digging through lists of special-government employees, we found several in key positions in the Trump administration, including Wendy Teramoto, Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross’s chief of staff and a longtime aide at his private equity firm; James D. Ray, a George W. Bush-era staffer who worked as an unpaid consultant at the Department of Transportation while keeping his job as a principal in KPMG’s infrastructure consulting practice; and Leonard Wolfson, who was lobbying on behalf of the Mortgage Bankers Association on Capitol Hill one week before getting paid $64 per hour as an expert at the Department of Housing and Urban Development the next week.

Wolfson’s case is a prime example of the inherent business conflicts in such arrangements: Wolfson is a well-known housing lobbyist among House Republicans and served in the Bush administration at HUD from 2005 to 2008. Senate records show Wolfson was actively lobbying on banking legislation and regulatory issues in April and May.

By mid-May, Wolfson had taken a relatively rare position as an outside “expert” at HUD while he was still employed at the 2,200-member lobbying group. To take the HUD gig, Wolfson took an unpaid leave from the Mortgage Bankers Association. He didn’t fully resign from the group until July 31.

At HUD, Wolfson worked on getting nominees for senior positions at the agency through the backlogged and slow Senate confirmation process, according to HUD officials.

Reached for comment, a HUD spokesman denied there was any conflict. “There was absolutely no overlap,” said Brian Sullivan. “He took one hat off and put another one on.”

His paid government consulting work this past summer was not previously disclosed. And in December, Wolfson himself was appointed and confirmed as HUD’s assistant secretary for congressional and intergovernmental relations.

We’re releasing Trump Town as a resource for journalists, researchers and the public. Its goal: to increase understanding of who the current administration’s taxpayer-funded decision-makers are and how their work histories and financial holdings might influence public policy.
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canpakes
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Re: Did Trump "Drain" the swamp?

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No.
Markk
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Re: Did Trump "Drain" the swamp?

Post by Markk »

K Graham wrote:
Mon Apr 25, 2022 1:58 pm
What We Found in Trump’s "Drained "Swamp: Hundreds of Ex-Lobbyists and D.C. Insiders
When the Trump administration took office early last year, hundreds of staffers from lobbying firms, conservative think tanks and Trump campaign groups began pouring into the very agencies they once lobbied or whose work they once opposed.

Today we’re making available, for the first time, an authoritative searchable database of 2,475 political appointees, including Trump’s Cabinet, staffers in the White House and senior officials within the government, along with their federal lobbying and financial records. Trump Town is the result of a year spent filing hundreds of Freedom of Information Act requests; collecting and organizing staffing lists; and compiling, sifting through and publishing thousands of financial disclosure reports.

Here’s what we found: At least 187 Trump political appointees have been federal lobbyists, and despite President Trump’s campaign pledge to “drain the swamp,” many are now overseeing the industries they once lobbied on behalf of. We’ve also discovered ethics waivers that allow Trump staffers to work on subjects in which they have financial conflicts of interest. In addition, at least 254 appointees affiliated with Trump’s 2016 presidential campaign and at least 125 staffers from prominent conservative think tanks are now working in the federal government, many of whom are on teams to repeal Obama-era regulations.

Drilling down even further, at least 35 Trump political appointees worked for or consulted with groups affiliated with the the billionaire libertarian brothers Charles and David Koch, who also have a network of advocacy groups, nonprofits, private companies and political action committees. At least 25 Trump appointees came from the influential Heritage Foundation, a conservative think tank founded in 1973, and at least two came from Heritage Action, its related political nonprofit. Heritage says the Trump administration, in just its first year, has enacted nearly two-thirds of its 334 policy recommendations.


We also found — for the first time — dozens of special-government employees, or SGEs, who work as paid consultants or experts for federal agencies while keeping their day jobs in the private sector. This rare government gig allows them to legally work for both industry and the Trump administration at the same time. Under the Obama administration, Huma Abedin, the longtime aide to former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, benefited from this policy while simultaneously working at the State Department, the Clinton Foundation and a corporate consulting firm, drawing scrutiny from the Senate Judiciary Committee and the Government Accountability Office.

Roughly 60 percent of the Trump administration officials included in our analysis have financial disclosure reports. We have requested these reports for the rest. Since our last update of financial disclosure records in August, we have added 660 such reports from across the government.

We also did a more limited version of this project in 2009, at the start of the Obama administration. As part of this year’s analysis, we compared the number of appointees in the first year of both the Obama and Trump administrations who had been active lobbyists in the two years prior to their nomination for Senate-confirmed government jobs. Even though the Trump administration has lagged significantly behind previous administrations in appointing people for such positions, more Trump appointees were recent lobbyists than Obama appointees: Trump had 18 in his first year, while Obama had 14.

“Focusing on novel scandals alone can distract from the enormous scale of the Trump administration’s embrace of revolving-door hiring,” said Jeff Hauser, executive director of the Revolving Door Project at the nonpartisan Center for Economic and Policy Research.

The pipelines between conservative policy think tanks — namely the Heritage Foundation and the Koch Brothers’ Freedom Partners Chamber of Commerce — and the Trump administration are clear, as is their effect on federal policy.

Just before Trump took office last January, Freedom Partners Chamber of Commerce, one of the main conservative advocacy groups funded by the Koch Brothers, unveiled a deregulatory wish list. The action plan highlighted 19 Obama-era policies affecting the environment, labor and technology that Freedom Partners wanted gone. “This strategy can help to unravel eight years of regulatory overreach starting immediately,” the organization’s vice president, Andy Koenig, wrote in an accompanying press release.

A few weeks later, Koenig joined the White House as a policy assistant, putting him in a position to implement his former employer’s agenda. Sure enough, just over a year later, the administration has acted on 16 of the 19 suggestions that Freedom Partners listed.

The moratorium on federal coal leases? Lifted. The Paris climate agreement? Withdrawn. The Clean Power Plan? Repealed. The FCC’s net neutrality policy, the EPA’s Waters of the United States rule, and the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s arbitration rules? All reversed.

Freedom Partners and the White House didn’t respond to requests for comment.

The Trump campaign had a small staff and was light on policy chops, so it leaned heavily on personnel from the Koch network and the Heritage Foundation during the transition. “When you have a president committed to strong deregulatory policy, there’s no better place to figure out what regulations put a stranglehold on the economy than to go to the Koch network and the Heritage Foundation,” said Marc Lampkin, the co-chair of Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck’s lobbying practice and a former aide to House Speaker John Boehner. “It makes perfect sense that they would be part of the intellectual breeding ground for the administration.”

The Heritage Foundation has touted its influence over Trump’s agenda. On Jan. 23, the organization said the Trump administration embraced two-thirds of the 334 policy recommendations in its “Mandate for Leadership,” such as shrinking national monuments in Utah, preventing taxpayer funding for international groups involved in abortion (known as the Mexico City Policy), raising military spending, and withdrawing from UNESCO.

Heritage cited the efforts of about 70 of its former employees working throughout the transition and administration. Our analysis found 28 officials who used to work at the Heritage Foundation and its advocacy arm, Heritage Action.

Not all political appointments are announced. In digging through lists of special-government employees, we found several in key positions in the Trump administration, including Wendy Teramoto, Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross’s chief of staff and a longtime aide at his private equity firm; James D. Ray, a George W. Bush-era staffer who worked as an unpaid consultant at the Department of Transportation while keeping his job as a principal in KPMG’s infrastructure consulting practice; and Leonard Wolfson, who was lobbying on behalf of the Mortgage Bankers Association on Capitol Hill one week before getting paid $64 per hour as an expert at the Department of Housing and Urban Development the next week.

Wolfson’s case is a prime example of the inherent business conflicts in such arrangements: Wolfson is a well-known housing lobbyist among House Republicans and served in the Bush administration at HUD from 2005 to 2008. Senate records show Wolfson was actively lobbying on banking legislation and regulatory issues in April and May.

By mid-May, Wolfson had taken a relatively rare position as an outside “expert” at HUD while he was still employed at the 2,200-member lobbying group. To take the HUD gig, Wolfson took an unpaid leave from the Mortgage Bankers Association. He didn’t fully resign from the group until July 31.

At HUD, Wolfson worked on getting nominees for senior positions at the agency through the backlogged and slow Senate confirmation process, according to HUD officials.

Reached for comment, a HUD spokesman denied there was any conflict. “There was absolutely no overlap,” said Brian Sullivan. “He took one hat off and put another one on.”

His paid government consulting work this past summer was not previously disclosed. And in December, Wolfson himself was appointed and confirmed as HUD’s assistant secretary for congressional and intergovernmental relations.

We’re releasing Trump Town as a resource for journalists, researchers and the public. Its goal: to increase understanding of who the current administration’s taxpayer-funded decision-makers are and how their work histories and financial holdings might influence public policy.
So you googled, and found an opinion piece fro 2018? But yes Kevin he did not drain the swamp…it still exists.

He started to drain the swamp, but it is seeping back in. Hillary and Bill are done…the Bush’s are done…at least I hope. Kevin he actually started getting things done. We were weaning ourself from wars…now we are back into one, a huge one. Manufacturing was making a come back…now they can’t even get parts and materials. The economy was strong and still is…and hopefully Biden won’t screw that up, he is doing a good job so far. Inflation was under control, now it a mess. I never got covid as did many Americans because Trump dropped all the BS and got vaccines done in record times…he was getting the border under control, now th e current administration won’t even tell what their plan is to put some sort of order their.

Now turn red in the face, pop a few veins in your neck…then hit google, data dredge, and find a site that says other wise to my points. Is Trump a a-hole…yes. Is a narcissist…yes, did he get us going in the right direction in many things yes…did he fail in some things yes. by the way he did a great job in getting (3) Supreme Court appointed…opps you just popped your juggler….

Love ya brother
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canpakes
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Re: Did Trump "Drain" the swamp?

Post by canpakes »

Markk, I think that the way you’re assigning blame or credit as you have above is debatable, but this comment in particular prompts a question:
Markk wrote:
Tue Apr 26, 2022 1:51 am
We were weaning ourself from wars…now we are back into one, a huge one.
I’m assuming that you’re referring to the Ukraine situation. What would you prefer us to do differently? Or do you prefer that we would stay completely outside of the situation in both opinion and supplies?
Markk
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Re: Did Trump "Drain" the swamp?

Post by Markk »

canpakes wrote:
Tue Apr 26, 2022 3:18 pm
Markk, I think that the way you’re assigning blame or credit as you have above is debatable, but this comment in particular prompts a question:
Markk wrote:
Tue Apr 26, 2022 1:51 am
We were weaning ourself from wars…now we are back into one, a huge one.
I’m assuming that you’re referring to the Ukraine situation. What would you prefer us to do differently? Or do you prefer that we would stay completely outside of the situation in both opinion and supplies?
No, I am just stating we are in major war on Biden's watch. Are you denying this? And it is not a situation, it is a war and we are very much involved and behind the scenes very much at the center of this war. This is Biden’s war in that he is the President.
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canpakes
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Re: Did Trump "Drain" the swamp?

Post by canpakes »

Markk wrote:
Tue Apr 26, 2022 3:46 pm
canpakes wrote:
Tue Apr 26, 2022 3:18 pm
Markk, I think that the way you’re assigning blame or credit as you have above is debatable, but this comment in particular prompts a question:



I’m assuming that you’re referring to the Ukraine situation. What would you prefer us to do differently? Or do you prefer that we would stay completely outside of the situation in both opinion and supplies?
No, I am just stating we are in major war on Biden's watch. Are you denying this? And it is not a situation, it is a war and we are very much involved and behind the scenes very much at the center of this war. This is Biden’s war in that he is the President.

1. How is this Biden’s war?

2. If Trump were President, would you characterize this the same?

3. Should we, in your opinion, be providing aid to Ukraine?
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Re: Did Trump "Drain" the swamp?

Post by Markk »

canpakes wrote:
Tue Apr 26, 2022 3:58 pm
Markk wrote:
Tue Apr 26, 2022 3:46 pm


No, I am just stating we are in major war on Biden's watch. Are you denying this? And it is not a situation, it is a war and we are very much involved and behind the scenes very much at the center of this war. This is Biden’s war in that he is the President.

1. How is this Biden’s war?

2. If Trump were President, would you characterize this the same?

3. Should we, in your opinion, be providing aid to Ukraine?
Really…

because he is the President?

Yes

Yes…we have no choice

WW1 was Wilsons war

WW2 was Rosevelts

Korea Truman

Vietnam Johnson

Bush sr Iraq

Bush the younger Iraq/Afghanistan

Biden Ukraine…

My point if you go back and read what I wrote is Trump was weening us away from war…he did a good job…he certainly did not suck in that regards. Trump was one of the few that said we should not go into Afghanistan…Obama and Biden said we should, and stay out of Iraq, if I remember correctly.
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Re: Did Trump "Drain" the swamp?

Post by Father Francis »

You missed couple. Reagan and Nicaragua ring a bell? Bush Sr and Panama? Clinton and Kosovo?

Not to mention the opening post wasn't citing an opinion piece. It was a piece with numbers and other data. You refuted neither.
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canpakes
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Re: Did Trump "Drain" the swamp?

Post by canpakes »

Markk wrote:
Tue Apr 26, 2022 4:29 pm
canpakes wrote:
Tue Apr 26, 2022 3:58 pm



1. How is this Biden’s war?

2. If Trump were President, would you characterize this the same?

3. Should we, in your opinion, be providing aid to Ukraine?
Really…

because he is the President?

Yes

Yes…we have no choice

WW1 was Wilsons war

WW2 was Rosevelts

Korea Truman

Vietnam Johnson

Bush sr Iraq

Bush the younger Iraq/Afghanistan

Biden Ukraine…

My point if you go back and read what I wrote is Trump was weening us away from war…he did a good job…he certainly did not suck in that regards. Trump was one of the few that said we should not go into Afghanistan…Obama and Biden said we should, and stay out of Iraq, if I remember correctly.

All of those conflicts/wars aside from Ukraine involved US troops. Ukraine doesn’t.

If we’re including wars that we supply materials to, but (arguably) not personnel, then you’ll have to add Somalia to your list for Trump:
Since his inauguration, President Donald J. Trump has presided over an unprecedented escalation of the U.S. counterterrorism war in Somalia. By mid-2019, the United States surpassed the number of strikes by drones and Special Operations raids of any previous year, and had also conducted double the number of strikes that it had through August 2018. With this escalation, Trump intensified a covert American war that had persisted since 2003, and which had killed more than 350 people before Trump took office. In 2017, the Trump administration more than doubled the number of strikes than that of any year that Obama was in office.
https://www.newamerica.org/internationa ... n-somalia/

I wouldn’t characterize Somalia as ‘Trump’s war’ any more than I’d characterize the Ukraine conflict as ‘Biden’s war’ anyway, but YMMV. If you’re going to go that way, consistency lends to credibility of the claim.
K Graham
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Re: Did Trump "Drain" the swamp?

Post by K Graham »

Markk wrote:
Tue Apr 26, 2022 1:51 am

He started to drain the swamp, but it is seeping back in.
No evidence he drained anything and you haven't provide any either.
Markk wrote:
Tue Apr 26, 2022 1:51 am
Hillary and Bill are done…the Bush’s are done…at least I hope.
So two different two term Presidents have retired and you attribute this to Trump? First, this claim is hilariously just wishful thinking, and second, you haven't even established that they represent the swamp. When politicians talk about the swamp they refer to the inside corruption and conflicts of interest that hamstring our political system. Trump did nothing but exacerbate that problem. He drained nothing. He fixed nothing. All he did was join in on the party and made things much worse by lowering the bar. He enriched himself and his friends and family more than perhaps any previous President in US history and he did so right out in the open. I've provided a plethora of examples and all you did is hand wave it away with , "Yes Trump is an A--hole." No, that isn't the point. He isn't just an A hole. He is corrupt to the core, which is the very thing you've been hypocritically trying to lay at JB's feet. Trump is every bit the moron you think JB is. He's every bit the disingenuous politician you think JB is. The difference is I can back it up, but all you do is complain about me sourcing my claims.
Markk wrote:
Tue Apr 26, 2022 1:51 am
Kevin he actually started getting things done.
You keep repeating this as if it has been established but it hasn't. You haven't named a single thing he's "done" that's praiseworthy.
We were weaning ourself from wars…now we are back into one, a huge one.
No we're not. We're not at war with anyone and you'd have to be a fool to assert otherwise. Providing funding to other countries so they can better defend themselves does not mean we're "at war." You want to give Trump some kind of credit for pulling out of Syria probably, but he abandoned our allies and left them to die which is something even his own military officials opposed doing. He didn't have the balls to pull out of Afghanistan because he knew the immediate blowback that would ensue, so he kicked the can down the road all the while promising to "have all troops home by Christmas." That was a lie, and then when Biden did what was the right thing to do, he did it even though he knew he'd be the one to suffer the political consequences that comes from any kind of withdrawal.
Manufacturing was making a come back…
That's BS. There were 10.5 million manufacturing jobs in 2010, and that was gradually increasing every year. When Trump took office in 2017 there were 12.5 million and in February 2020 just before the COVID shutdowns, there were only 12.7 million manufacturing jobs.
now they can’t even get parts and materials.
Who is they?
The economy was strong and still is…
Just 2% GDP and an average of 140,000 jobs per month isn't a "strong economy." The economy has since taken off after Trump left. Av month jobs over 600,000 and GDP is over 5% which is its highest in decades.
and hopefully Biden won’t screw that up, he is doing a good job so far.
You mean the way Trump screwed up Obama's recovery? More jobs created in Obama's last three years than were created in Trump's first three.
Inflation was under control, now it a mess.
Inflation was at record lows for years and has nothing to do with who is President. Inflation isn't a mess if you understand economics. Most Americans at the bottom have been benefiting greatly from recent inflation spikes.
I never got covid as did many Americans because Trump dropped all the BS and got vaccines done in record times…
So you are dumb enough to think Trump was in the lab working on a vaccine and that he created it in "record time"? The fact is a vaccine for coronaviruses had already been in the works and the company who came up with the first vaccine in "record time" didn't use a dime of Federal money to do so.
he was getting the border under control
So you're telling me no one crossed the border illegally while Trump was in office?
now the current administration won’t even tell what their plan is to put some sort of order their.
The current administration approaches this issue in a legal manner whereas the orange tyrant didn't care about international law and decided he'd just kidnap children and then send them off with no chain of custody.
Now turn red in the face, pop a few veins in your neck…then hit google
You're quite naïve when it comes to hypocritically complaining about Google. You googled how many links in the other thread about Hunter Biden? The difference between us is I back up my assertions with sources. You hate it and just whine about
"google."
Last edited by K Graham on Tue Apr 26, 2022 6:05 pm, edited 4 times in total.
"I am not an American ... In my view premarital sex should be illegal" - Ajax18
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