Gas goes to $9.45/gallon in Mendecino, CA

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Gunnar
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Re: Gas goes to $9.45/gallon in Mendecino, CA

Post by Gunnar »

Xenophon wrote:
Wed Jun 22, 2022 1:20 pm
I'll partly blame the companies around my neck of the woods that put it in. The majority of their literature and pitch focuses on energy savings/cost and doesn't focus nearly enough on the other positives. As more and more folks get into it, I'm sure awareness and acceptance will continue to rise. Honestly if I was a new builder, I don't think I'd even put a home in without it.
If I were a builder, I would also not want to build homes without solar power--especially in places like California. A new solar powered home need not cost significantly more to build than a conventional home. Green is often less expensive when all things are considered
Sustainable building often seems more expensive than conventional building. Many of the building materials that make houses more durable and easier to heat and cool aren’t cheap. Complicated systems that allow a certain amount of energy independence–photovoltaic and solar hot water panels, for instance—can be very pricey. Common sense would tell most builders that it costs more to spray 8 inches of polyurethane foam in the roof than it would to install fiberglass batts.

But appearances can be deceiving. Take, for example, a decision to upgrade from double-pane to triple-pane windows. The windows will add thousands of dollars to construction costs. But they could eliminate the need for a warm-air register in front of each window, and the savings in labor and duct installation could offset the additional cost of the windows. In addition, the lower heating load means the size of the furnace can be downgraded. End result? Lower overall construction costs.

Savings can come in other ways. Spending more money for more durable materials is cheaper in the long run because they won’t have to be replaced as often. Considering life-cycle costs, rather than focusing solely on initial costs, can yield some surprising results.

Green building isn’t an all-or-nothing proposition. As long as the basics are there, the house can be upgraded over time. If solar panels are an intriguing long-term option but not in the cards right now, for instance, pre-plumb for the panels and install them when the budget allows.
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Binger
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Re: Gas goes to $9.45/gallon in Mendecino, CA

Post by Binger »

Gunnar wrote:
Wed Jun 22, 2022 3:32 pm
Take, for example, a decision to upgrade from double-pane to triple-pane windows. The windows will add thousands of dollars to construction costs. But they could eliminate the need for a warm-air register in front of each window, and the savings in labor and duct installation could offset the additional cost of the windows. In addition, the lower heating load means the size of the furnace can be downgraded. End result? Lower overall construction costs.
The number one statistical indicator of failing airborne infection control conditions is....... an energy conservation consultant or program. That is true for hospitals, commercial buildings, schools and homes. To a rule, if a facility has implemented an energy conservation program to reduce HVAC energy, fan sizes, duct sizes, air changes and outside air changes... they do so at the expense of health and safety.
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Doctor Steuss
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Re: Gas goes to $9.45/gallon in Mendecino, CA

Post by Doctor Steuss »

ajax18 wrote:
Wed Jun 22, 2022 12:13 pm
How much is the Ford F-150 lightning. I read it's only $95k fully loaded. That's a lot less than I would have thought.
Whatever the retail cost of the Lightning, I'm guessing people will see similar market conditions with dealers as the Raptor when it's released. For a while here, it wasn't unheard of to see Raptors with a $30K+ "Demand Fee" added onto the sticker price. When my boss' husband was shopping for one a few years (I think?) back, he said he came across one at a dealership that had a $80K "Demand Fee" tacked on.
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Moksha
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Re: Gas goes to $9.45/gallon in Mendecino, CA

Post by Moksha »

Binger wrote:
Wed Jun 22, 2022 4:10 pm
The number one statistical indicator of failing airborne infection control conditions is....... an energy conservation consultant or program. That is true for hospitals, commercial buildings, schools and homes. To a rule, if a facility has implemented an energy conservation program to reduce HVAC energy, fan sizes, duct sizes, air changes and outside air changes... they do so at the expense of health and safety.
Not to mention windmills. Those are bad hombres, with that whrrr, whrrr noise. Kills the birds and hurts golf course property values.
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Vēritās
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Re: Gas goes to $9.45/gallon in Mendecino, CA

Post by Vēritās »

ajax18 wrote:
Wed Jun 22, 2022 12:13 pm
How much is the Ford F-150 lightning. I read it's only $95k fully loaded. That's a lot less than I would have thought.
They start at $39k and go up to $90k according to the Ford website. Not sure that includes the $7,500 tax incentive.
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Xenophon
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Re: Gas goes to $9.45/gallon in Mendecino, CA

Post by Xenophon »

Binger wrote:
Wed Jun 22, 2022 2:32 pm
I completely agree. And, that is a very different financial model.

Like your kitchen example, often the most energy efficient and environmentally friendly choice is to just repair and maintain the stuff we already got. That is true for cars and homes and lots of things. When we factor in manufacturing and transportation and sourcing raw materials, would all be better off just sticking to what we have and not upgrading constantly. But, that is not going to happen. So we spend more and buy more and consume more for pleasure, convenience and for investment return.
A lot to agree with here. For us the decision came at the same time as needing a new roof. It seemed like a wise idea to try to maximize the time the panels could stay up before potentially needing to pull them up for another replacement.
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Doctor CamNC4Me
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Re: Gas goes to $9.45/gallon in Mendecino, CA

Post by Doctor CamNC4Me »

Just adding my two cents, since it started to get sunny our average kilowatt-hours-used dropped by 900-1000kw* (it’s varying from month-to-month). It’s pretty startling to see how much relief solar panels provide to the grid, especially when it gets hotter. 4300 lbs of CO2 saved, and something like 32 trees planted <- the equivalent planted.

- Doc

* 500-600kw/month produced plus a change switching from heating to cooling (we’re all electric). We’ll get a better idea of overall energy savings in July, August, and September when it’s really hot here.
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Binger
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Re: Gas goes to $9.45/gallon in Mendecino, CA

Post by Binger »

Xenophon wrote:
Wed Jun 22, 2022 8:16 pm
Binger wrote:
Wed Jun 22, 2022 2:32 pm
I completely agree. And, that is a very different financial model.

Like your kitchen example, often the most energy efficient and environmentally friendly choice is to just repair and maintain the stuff we already got. That is true for cars and homes and lots of things. When we factor in manufacturing and transportation and sourcing raw materials, would all be better off just sticking to what we have and not upgrading constantly. But, that is not going to happen. So we spend more and buy more and consume more for pleasure, convenience and for investment return.
A lot to agree with here. For us the decision came at the same time as needing a new roof. It seemed like a wise idea to try to maximize the time the panels could stay up before potentially needing to pull them up for another replacement.
That makes a ton of sense. Great posts and great contribution to the thread, Xeno.
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